What Are The Different Types Of Blade Shapes Available On SOG Fixed Blade Knives?

A blade shape is referred to as a shape. There are five main shape types: straight, cavalry, japanese kenjian, rikido, and custom. Each one has a different feel to it and adds something special to your knife.

Straight knives have no back or sides. The majority of the blade is the part that goes in and out of the knife handle. These blades are typically longer and thinner than others. They can be either thin or fat!

Cavalry knives have a slightly rounded tip that becomes thicker as the knife gets taller. The thickness makes this cavalry knife fat! These sometimes get nickname squashed knives because they look like one piece of metal is going to break off and leave a big fat blade behind.

The fifth type of blade shape is custom-made by adding or removing pieces or all of the sword shape.

Clip point

The clip point shape is one of the more unusual blade shapes you can find on a knife. It is typically reserved for use on cutting tools, as opposed to a serrated or rounded shape.

The clip point has two main characteristics: its tip is serrated, and it can be folded in half to create a non-serrated edge. Both traits make this shape unique, as it can be used for slashing or cutting purposes.

Many blades featuring the clip point are thin-to-medium strength, making them an OK choice for beginners. Others are stronger and might be better fit for more advanced users.

Spear point

The spear point is one of the more unusual blade shapes available on fixed blade knives. It is often referred to as a dagger point, or a shortpointed dag

Paralleled with military applications, the spear point has good slashing capability, making it very useful in close quarters battle.

As the name suggests, the spear point has a pointed end on the knife blade. This end is particularly large, and can be serrated or non-serrated. The non-serated side is used for training purposes, and makes it easier to distinguish between blades when training.

Some spear points have a guard on them to make it easier to hold onto while fighting. Having this protection also helps prevent you from being finished off by an opponent.

Half-drop point

The half-drop point is one of the most popular shapes for blade shapes. This shape has the point upper-most and a longer, thicker lower-most section. This shape can provide more area to work with, making it more efficient at disassembling and assemblin g foods and cooking techniques that make use of the bottom of the knife blade.

The half-drop point is also one of the more difficult blade shapes to transition from straight to hollow. While there are some qualified chefs who can manage to hold a straight knife at an angle for long periods of time, most requires a hollow knife for prep work.

Many cookbook authors and bloggers advocate using a half-drop point for cutting tasks like meats, potatoes, or even cardboard. The slightly rounded bottom makes this easier than a flat top would be.

Spear-point modified

The spear-point modified mode is one of the most popular shapes for blade shapes. This mode consists of a pointy tip, followed by a concave back that tapers to a smooth edge.

This shape is ideal for cutting, because you can match your momentum to the knife’s motion. When you release the knife’s heel, another knife or weapon style can launch its blade forward in an instant kill or reconciliation method.

This mode is also very versatile as far as appearance goes. You can have short blades or longer ones, traditional or flashy designs, there is a blade shape for you!

These modes are just like musical modes: you can have low pitch, high pitch, and between those two pitches there is no specific pitch! These different pitches represent different temperaments and needs.

Hook blade

The hook blade shape is one of the most common blade shapes in combat knives.

Full-drop point

The full-drop point is one of the most visible blade shapes available on fixed blade knives. These knives have a pointed tip that extends toward the ground when in use.

These blades can be good for cutting, due to their long and slender shape. The short length also makes these blades easy to store and carry. However, these blades can be harder to sharpen due to the longer length.

Short back and side handle muscles make this blade look nice when paired with a handle of matching material. Because these blades can’t be sharpened as easily, some quality knife sharpers may overlook them as less quality knives may not match them up well.

Short back and side handle muscles make this blade look nice when paired with a handle of matching material. Because these blades can’t be sharpened as easily, some quality knife Sharpers may overlook them as less quality knives may not match them up well.

Double-edge blade

The double-edge blade is one of the most recognizable blade shapes in knife culture. This is a long, thin blade that has a rounded tip.

These blades can be very effective at cutting, but not all double-edge blades are equal. Some have more length to the blade, making it more efficient at cutting.

The length of the blade also means the user has to manually sharpen the knife more often. When you need to use a certain level of sharpness every time you pick up your knife, the longerblade will not be enough.

Upper spear-point

The upper spear-point is one of the most notable blade shapes available on a fixed blade knife. This shape has the thick, sharpened tip of the spear-point on one side, and a thinner, rounded edge on the other.

Upper spear-points are very unusual in that they can have a short, thick spear-point or a long, thin hackle point. The short version is more suitable for piercing and cutting while the long version is better at holding an edge longer!

Both versions of this blade shape are very rare, which is why there are so few knives with this shape.


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